Ask The HvacMan
Air Grilles
Air Diffusers
Air Quailty
All Air Systems
All Water Systems
Boilers
Building .Managament Systems ..BMS
Burners
CAD
Chillers
Cooling Towers
Cooling Load Calculation
Cryogenics
Energy Saving
Duct
Duct ,Smacna
Dampers ,Air
Dust Collection
Fans
Fire Dampers
Glass Selection
Heating
Heat Exchangers,water
Heat Recovery
Heat Tracing Systems
Hepa Filters
Hvac Applications
Humidifiers / Dehumidifiers
Insulation , Duct
Insulation , Pipe
Insulation , Sound
Nano Tech.,In Building
Occupancy Sensors
Pneumatic Conveying
Piping
Pool Ventilation
Process Piping
Psychrometry
Pumps
Radiant Heating
Refrigerant Systems
Solar Collectors
Sound
Steam Generation
Tables & Charts Gnr.
VAV Sytems
Valves
Ventilation
VRV Systems
STORE
Solar Collectors
Flat Plate Collectors
Evacuated Tube Collectors
Concentrating Collectors
Transpired Collectors
Solar Control Systems
Standalone Systems
Grid Connected Systems
Hybrid Systems
Back-up Systems
Solar Cells
Solar Arrays
Inverters
Change Controller
Turbines
Hybrid Systems
Grid Systems
Water Pumping
Using Wind Energy
Enviromental Aspects
Buyer's Guide
 
Save Energy
Solar Water Heating
Solar Electric Systems
Wind Turbines
Passive Solar Heating
Passive Solar Cooling
Building Material
Water Conservation
Ground Source Heat-Pumps
Green Hotels

Glass &Windows Selection

Biological Contamination in the HVAC System  
The heating, ventilating, and air­conditioning system (HVAC) in a building is very  similar to the respiratory system in a human body.  The HVAC system   provides conditioned air to building oc­cupants and is essential to the comfort of building  occupants, and necessary to the operation of the building.  The respiratory system  delivers oxygenated air to the blood stream in a human body and is essential to the  survival of humans.  The importance of these two systems is clearly significant to  humans.   
To provide sound attenuation and to conserve energy, the HVAC system,   including the air handling unit and the air­duct, is often insulated with fiberglass and  other insulation materials.  Some air­ducts are insulated internally or externally.  There  are also air­ducts made of glass fiberboard.  Internal insulation materials with a rough  porous surface will trap particles and particulates from the air stream.  Materials trapped  include pollen grains, plant matter (including decayed leaves, plant hairs, or fern spores),  fungal spores, insect parts, skin flakes, paper fibers, and other organic matter.  These  materials are often hygroscopic and can absorb moisture from the air.  With sufficient  moisture content in the accumulated dust, fungal spores germinate and grow.  During the  cooling season, condensation from cooling coils and water in the drain pans allow fungi  and bacteria to proliferate.   
The HVAC systems are designed for cooling during hot months and for heating during  cold months.  During the cooling cycle, warm air is cooled by passing through the  cooling coils.  Excessive moisture in the warm air is condensed into liquid water when   passing through the cooling coils. Air discharged from the cooling coils often has  elevated relative humidity.  Therefore, the cooling coils, condensate drainage pan, and  adjacent areas are primary amplification sites for fungal and bacterial growth.   Humidifiers in certain systems also provide moisture for microbial growth.  Several cases  of excessive fungal and bacterial growth and reported illnesses were associated with cold  water humidifiers in the HVAC system.  Humidifiers were found to have bacterial growth  and endotoxin levels.  As with many IAQ problems, it is difficult to directly link  environmental data with actual illnesses.  
Biological Contaminants in the HVAC System    Various biocontaminants may be found in the HVAC system.  The primary  biocontaminants are fungi and bacteria.  Secondary biocontaminants may include mites,  insects, or nematodes.  Many fungi and bacteria are saprophytes and very adaptable to the  environment as long as there are organic nutrients and sufficient moisture. Secondary  contaminants are often the result of fungal growth.  Fungal contaminants produce  allergens; mycotoxins; beta­1,3­glucans; and fungal volatile organic chemicals (VOCs).    Bacterial contaminants may produce allergenic proteins, toxins (endotoxins in particular),  and bacterial VOCs. Occu­pants in buildings with a contaminated HVAC system  occasionally report musty odors.  These odors can often be traced to microbial  amplification in the system. Some bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, may cause  opportunistic infections.  These bio­contaminants can produce adverse health effects in   exposed building occupants.     
Moisture­loving fungi, such as Acremonium spp., Aureobasidium pullulans, Exophiala  spp., Phoma spp., Sporobolomyces spp., Rhodotorula spp., and yeasts, are common  inhabitants of cooling coils and drain pans.  In addition, Gram­negative bacteria and  endotoxins at elevated levels have been detected and reported from drain pans and  contaminated humidifiers.  A second group of fungi can be found thriving in insulated  ductwork downstream and adjacent to cooling coils.  They are mostly Cladosporium spp.  (primarily C. cladosporioides), Penicillium spp. (primarily P. corylophilum), and  occasionally, Aspergillus spp.  These fungi grow well at a moderately high water activity  near 0.85 and 0.90 (water activity measures available water in substrates for microbial  growth; the highest water activity is 1.0).  Gram­negative bacteria are seldom detected in  large numbers with these fungi.    Besides fungi and bacteria, signs of mites and insects have been observed among fungal  growth on a few occasions.  Intact fungal spores have been seen in insect and mite fecal pellets, suggesting that insects and mites fed on fungal spores.  In one instance,  nematodes and a nematode­trapping fungus, Harposporium anguillae, were recovered  from slime in a drainage pan in the HVAC system of a large building. Endotoxin  (produced by Gram­negative bacteria) exposures were associated with cases of sick  building syndrome in an office. The source of endotoxins in that instance was identified  to be contaminated humidifiers and ventilation ducts.   

There are several approaches  to address concerns of biocontamination in the HVAC  system.     

1.  Upgrade filtration efficiency of the system.  A mechanical engineer should be  consulted regarding pressure drop from higher filtration efficiency.  Filters  should be replaced or cleaned according to the manufacturer’s  recommendations. 

2.  Clean and maintain regularly the cooling coil and drainage pan,   preferably quarterly or twice a year.  The frequency should be decided upon  depending on the age, operation, uses, and history of the system. 

3.  Maintain insulation in the air handling unit and the ductwork to minimize  conditions for the amplification and accumulation of biocontaminants.  The  maintenance should include upgrading filters, making sure that filters are  installed properly and do not allow bypass, changing filters on a timelybasis,  inspecting cooling coils and drainage pans, and cleaning the insulation materials  when necessary. 

4.  Consider cleaning the HVAC system when there are obvious signs of microbial  growth and/or heavy dust accumulation.  Consult a competent environmental   professional for an evaluation. 

5.  Design the HVAC system so that the air stream does not contact   internal insulation with a rough porous surface.  

6.  Inspect and maintain humidifiers regularly.  Avoid installing and   using cold water humidifiers. 

7.  Place outside air intakes away from street level, cooling towers, and loading  dock areas.  Air intakes should be cleaned to remove litter and dirt.   

Microbial contamination in buildings and its impact on indoor air quality (IAQ) are well  documented.  Several recent articles suggest that as much as one third of IAQ problems  may be microbe­related.  Microbial contamination was the primary IAQ concern in  approximately 29% of more than 150 office buildings studied by the State of Minnesota.   It is important to note that no environmental and clinical correlation was established in the Minnesota studies.  The etiologic agents, whether allergens, mycotoxins, endotoxins,  or microbial VOCs, that were responsible for IAQ complaints were not identified.   However, complaints of poor IAQ in the buildings involved disappeared, subsided, or  were greatly reduced after biocontamination was abated.  
 

Porous materials are commonly used for acoustical and thermal insulation inside the  HVAC system.  Microbial growth and amplification are known to occur in soft, porous  insulation materials.  Poorly maintained humidifiers, cooling coils and drainage pans  provide a wet environment for microbial amplification.  Many biocontaminants have  been identified in HVAC systems.  They can cause adverse health effects to building  occupants.  As outlined above, steps can be taken to prevent these problems.       Also, there is usually mixed growth of various molds and bacteria together in  a wet and damp environment.  An actively growing mold may provide or release various  bio­active agents, such as allergens, mycotoxins, microbial volatile organic compounds,  and glucan.  People with differing levels of immunity may suffer varying reactions  different to these agents.  building operators, managers, and  occupants is not to allow microbial growth and amplification to occur in the building; if  you can prevent colonization and growth, then you do not need to worry about the  various health effects caused by microbes.    The following microbes may be associated with the HVAC system, including cooling  towers.   

1.  Legionella pneumophila, a common waterborne bacterium, may be detected in  cooling tower water or the building potable water system (particularly hot   water).  It is known to cause Legionnaire’s disease and pontiac fever. 

  2.  Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common waterborne bacterium, may cause  opportunistic infection.  It grows in water, from potable water to stagnant water.   

3.  Cladosporium cladosporioides,   a common mold found outdoors, is a common colonizer of a dirty HVAC  system, particularly just downstream from cooling coils.  Spores of  Cladosporium are potentially allergenic and Clado­ sporium has been associated   with hypersensitivity pneumonitis. 

  4.  Penicillium corylyphilum is another common colonizer of a dirty HVAC  system.  Spores of Penicillium are potentially allergenic. 

  5.  Endotoxin is a cell wall component  of Gram ­negative bacteria, which is  common and abundant in any water.  It is released into the environment when  bacteria grow, divide, or die.   Endotoxin is known to cause various adverse  health effects related to the respiratory system.

More information about Hotel Design
 
Back to Hotels
Back to Hvac Expert Main Page

 

 

 

 
 
   
 
  http://www.iklimnet.com
 
Hotels
Enviroment
Legionnare Disease
Energy Saving
Control Software
Hotel Design Books

Hotel Design